FAQs

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GEORGETOWN TOWING AND PARKING FAQ’S

Q.  How can I find my vehicle if it has been towed?
Q.  Will my car be towed away if I park on the lot of a closed business?
Q.  Why should it matter if I park on a closed businesses parking lot?
Q.  How much will it cost to release my vehicle from the impound?
Q.  Can a tow truck driver simply tow away my vehicle or do they have to wait for permission from the property owner?  Is patrolling the lot legal?
Q.  How do I handle damages of my vehicle that were created during the towing process?
Q.  Shouldn’t cities require businesses to share their parking space after business hours?
Q.  What happens if I return before the tow truck operator removes my vehicle? Will I have to still pay for the tow?
Q.  What types of payment does a tow truck company usually take?  Will they deny my credit card?
Q.  What steps should I take if I feel that I have been illegally towed or overcharged?
Q.  How does the towing process work? Who makes the final decision of when a vehicle should be towed?
Q.  How can I tell if a towing procedure and policy is enforced on the premises I wish to park my vehicle?
Q.  Is a towing company allowed to tow away a vehicle without permission from the owner?

A. In most cases, all you would have to do is contact your local police department. When your vehicle is towed, the towing service who tows your vehicle is required to inform the local police office of any towed vehicles.

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A. Yes, your vehicle can still be closed after business hours. It depends on the contract the property owner and the towing company established.

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A. Some feel that an unauthorized car can be a liability. They do not want to be held responsible if an unauthorized vehicle is damaged, broken into or stolen.

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A. The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations as well as certain municipalities set towing fee maximums. As far as what you would have to pay, the towing company would have to charge whichever amount is higher. However, your payment can also be way more than any set maximums because of additional fees for storage. Impound fees and storage fees are completely different.

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A. It depends on the terms of the agreement established by the property owner and the towing company. At this time, there are no laws that limit tow truck operators from patrolling lots.

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A. In most cases you would file insurance claim with your company or take the matter to civil court. However, it’s important to know that most towing companies have surveillance and video cameras in their storage facility and on their trucks. They have surveillance to prohibit bogus claims.

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A. While it would be more than ideal for cities to inform property owners to share parking, cities have no right how to tell private property owners who can and cannot park. However, there are some property owners that have agreements with that make sharing parking space an easy process.

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A. Yes, you will still have to pay. However, you would only have to pay the drop fee that is set by Texas state and certain municipalities.   To determine the pricing for your unique situation, you can visit :  http://www.tdlr.texas.gov/towing/towinglaw.htm#2308204

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A. You can pay a vehicle storage facility debit card, credit card, or an electronic check for any charge that is affiliated with delivery or storage of your vehicle.

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A. If you think you have been treated poorly or if you would like to make a formal complaint about poor service, damage, property signs or employees, you can contact the TDLR.

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A. A typical towing arrangement is usually between the property owner and the towing company. A property owner can either request a removal of a vehicle by written or verbal request.

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A. If you visit an establishment that has towing enforced, they must display proper signage (tow away signs) in all entry ways of the particular establishment.  You can learn more information by going to:  http://www.tdlr.texas.gov/towing/towinglaw.htm#2308301  to find out more.

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A. The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation has set forth certain codes of when it is okay to tow a vehicle without permission from the owner.  According to the TDLR codes,  a towing company has the right to tow an unauthorized vehicle due to the following:

  • A towing company cannot remove any unauthorized vehicle without permission from the owner, unless it is  instructed to do so by a peace offer or the owner or operator of the vehicle
  • A towing company can  remove a vehicle if it is interrupting the regular flow of traffic, such as blocking a driveway or entrance way
  • A towing company that has liability insurance for property damage can remove an unauthorized vehicle
  • If an official standing agreement is set in place, the towing company can remove an unauthorized vehicle
  • If the vehicle is  violating the property signage that informs them of towing laws

For more detailed information about towing laws and regulations at:  http://www.tdlr.texas.gov/